government
The Government Of
The Novgorod Region
Tourist portal Novgorod Region novgorod.travel novgorod.travel
About object
The Volkhov Front was established on 17 December 1941 in accordance with the 11 December 1941 order of the Headquarters of the Supreme High Command. It comprised the left flank of the Leningrad Front and the reserve units of the HQ Supreme High Command (the 2nd Shock Army, the 4th, 26th, 29th, 52nd and 59th Combined Arms armies). Their mission was to rout the enemy group of forces on the left bank of the Volkhov River, to advance to the north-west in coordination with the Leningrad Front, and to lift the siege of Leningrad. Between January and April 1942, the troops sustained heavy losses in the area of Lyuban. On 23 April 1942, the Volkhov Front was reorganised as the Volkhov Operational Group of the Leningrad Front by decision of the HQ Supreme High Command dated 23 April 1942. The troops of the front took part in the following operations Strategic Operations Tikhvin Strategic Offensive Operation (1941) Army Group and Army Operations Tikhvin-Kirishi Offensive Operation (1941) Malaya Vishera Offensive Operation (1941) Lyuban Offensive Operation (1942) The Volkhov Front was reinstated on 9 June 1942 by the order of the HQ Supreme High Command dated 8 June 1942 based on the formations of the Volkhov Operational Group of the Leningrad Front. It comprised the 2nd Shock Army and the 4th, 8th, 52nd, 54th and 59th Combined Arms armies. The 14th Air Army was created at the Volkhov Front in August 1942. Fighting jointly with the Leningrad Front, the units of the Volkhov Front conducted offensive operations near Sinyavin, trying to break through Leningrad’s siege in August and September 1942. It did not attain its goal, but the offensive operations prevented the Germans from storming the city. In January 1943, the troops of the Volkhov and Leningrad fronts undertook one more attempt. This time they managed to secure a land corridor towards Leningrad. In the winter of 1944, the units of the Volkhov Front took part in a successful operation against Germany’s Army Group North to liberate Novgorod. The front was dissolved on 15 February 1944 by the order of the HQ Supreme High Command dated 13 February 1944. The units of its right flank were incorporated into the Leningrad Front, its left flank was dispatched to reinforce the 2nd Baltic Front, and its field army was put on standby in the reserve of the HQ Supreme High Command. Volkhov Front’s engagements Strategic Operations Leningrad-Novgorod Strategic Offensive Operation (1944) Operation Spark (1943) Army Group and Army Operations Mga Offensive Operation (1943) Novgorod-Luga Offensive Operation (1944) Operation to help the 2nd Shock Army break out of encirclement (1942) Sinyavino Offensive Operation 1942 The combat activities of the Volkhov Front can be roughly divided into three stages. Each of them was important for the success of the battle of Leningrad and for routing the enemy in the north-western direction. Stages The first stage lasted from September 1941 until the end of 1942. Between September and early December 1941, the 4th and 52nd armies, which were directly subordinate to the HQ Supreme High Command and conducted defensive operations south-east of Leningrad in coordination with the 54th Army of the Leningrad Front and the Army Group Novgorod [all these units were later included in the Volkhov Front], supported by the Baltic Fleet, prevented the Germans’ attempt to bypass Lake Ladoga in the south to link up with the Finnish forces on the Svir River and complete the blockade of Leningrad, despite German superiority in arms and equipment. In December 1941, the Volkhov Front, which included the 4th Army, the 59th Army [former Army Group Novgorod], the 26th Reserve Army [reorganised as the 2nd Shock Army on 25 December 1941] and the 52nd Army, supported by the Leningrad Front, the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, delivered a crushing blow to the most dangerous Tikhvin group of German forces, pushing it across the Volkhov River. The counteroffensive near Tikhvin, coupled with the counteroffensive operations near Moscow and Rostov-on-Don, prevented the Germans from encircling Leningrad and alleviated the plight of the besieged city. In 1942, the forces of the Volkhov Front, which had been reinforced with the 8th and 54th armies of the Leningrad Front and a newly created 14th Air Army, acting jointly with the Leningrad and North-Western fronts, the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, launched the Lyuban Operation (January-July) and the Sinyavino Operation (August-September) to break through Leningrad’s blockade. Although they did not produce the desired effect, the enemy sustained heavy losses. The Soviet army prevented it from launching a new offensive against Leningrad, decimating its reserves, including the 11th Army of Erich von Manstein, which had been moved from Crimea to Leningrad. In addition, the Soviet forces stymied the southward movement of German troops deployed near Leningrad, primarily towards Stalingrad where a decisive battle was ongoing. The second stage lasted throughout 1943. In January 1943, the Volkhov Front, supported by the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, delivered powerful pincer attacks south of Lake Ladoga, breaking though Leningrad’s blockade to create a land route towards the city and dramatically improve the situation on land and sea, as well as living and working conditions in Leningrad. It was a tremendous military and political achievement, which created conditions for the subsequent lifting of the siege of Leningrad. From February to December 1943, the Volkhov Front (minus the 2nd Shock Army and the 4th Army), in coordination with the Leningrad Front and supported by the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, carried out three offensives to route the Sinyavino-Mga group of enemy forces, which was trying to break through to Lake Ladoga in the south. German Army Group North, primarily its 18th Army, sustained heavy losses. Germans could no longer wage new offensives against Leningrad, where the situation stabilised. The German command could not divert large groups of forces from Leningrad to other parts of the Soviet-German front, such as Kursk where a major battle was going against the Germans. The third stage took place in January and the first half of February 1944, when the Volkhov Front, acting in coordination with the Leningrad Front, the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, carried out a large offensive operation to finally rout the enemy near Leningrad. That operation included the Novgorod-Luga offensive, which was mostly conducted by the Volkhov Front. During the January offensive, the Leningrad and Volkhov fronts inflicted a heavy toll on the enemy, lifted the siege of Leningrad and liberated Novgorod greatly improving the situation in the north-western regions. The Soviet offensive near Leningrad and Novgorod was the first of a series of offensive operations in 1944. The Germans’ defeat south of Leningrad impressed its ally, Finland, which ultimately signed an armistice. Overall, the Volkhov Front, acting on orders of the HQ Supreme High Command, conducted nine army group operations, including one defensive (Tikhvin) operation and eight offensive ones. The front’s forces waged offensive operations for 856 days in coordination with the Leningrad and North-Western fronts and with support from the Baltic Fleet and long-range aviation, thwarting enemy plans and preventing the Germans from storming Leningrad. The Supreme Commander-in-Chief on many occasions commended the Volkhov Front forces for their contribution, perseverance, combat experience and heroism. Thousands of soldiers, sergeants, offices and generals received state decorations, 36 of them were awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union, and 70 small and large units were assigned names of honour. But the Volkhov Front also sustained losses. The largest of them was the defeat of the 2nd Shock Army during the Lyuban Operation, which was costly in lives, weapons and military equipment, mostly due to the treachery of the army’s former commander Andrei Vlasov. But his betrayal did not cast a shadow on the servicemen, who did not lose courage but continued to fight valiantly against the Nazi invaders. The Volkhov Front acted in close coordination with the Leningrad Front, the Baltic Fleet, primarily the Ladoga Flotilla, long-range aviation and partisans. Volkhov Front Commanders Commander-in-Chief of the Volkhov Front Kirill Meretskov Marshal Kirill Meretskov, [born on 26 May (7 June, Old style) 1897, in Nazaryevo, now Zaraisky District of the Moscow Region – died on 30 December 1968 in Moscow], Marshal of the Soviet Union (26 October 1944), Hero of the Soviet Union (21 March 1940), member of the Soviet Communist Party (1917). Born into a peasant family, joined the Red Army in 1918, fought in the Civil War (1918-1920) on the Eastern and Southern fronts as unit commissar and deputy chief of staff (brigade and division). Graduated from the Military Academy (1921), held the posts of chief of staff of the Moscow and Byelorussian military districts and the Separate Far Eastern Army, deputy chief of the General Staff, commander of the Volga and Leningrad military districts. Fought for the republican government as a volunteer during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1937). During the Soviet-Finnish (Winter) War in 1939-1940, commanded the 7th Army, which took part in the attempt to break through the Mannerheim Line in the Vyborg area. Chief of the General Staff (August 1940), Deputy People’s Commissar (Minister) of Defence (January 1941). At the beginning of the Great Patriotic War, commanded the 7th, 4th and 33rd armies, which defeated Germans near Tikhvin. Commander of the Volkhov Front (December 1941-February 1944), Karelian Front (February-November 1944) and the Maritime Group of Forces (April 1945). In August 1945, he led the 1st Far Eastern Front, which helped defeat Japan’s forces in Manchuria and North Korea. After the war, he was commander of the Primorye (Maritime), Moscow, Belomorsky (White Sea) and Northern military districts. In 1955-1964, he was an aide to the Soviet Defence Minister in charge of military universities. In April 1964, he was assigned to the Defence Ministry’s group of inspectors general. Candidate member of the Central Committee of the Soviet Communist Party (1939-1956), member of the Central Audit Commission of the Soviet Communist Party (1956-1961). Deputy of the USSR Supreme Soviet of the first to fifth convocations. Awarded seven Orders of Lenin, one Order of Victory, one Order of the October Revolution, four Orders of the Red Banner, two Orders of Suvorov 1st Class, one Order of Kutuzov 1st Class, numerous Soviet medals and several orders and medals of foreign states. Buried at the Kremlin Wall on Red Square. The core of the front’s commanders changed very little throughout the war. The first commanding team included the front’s commander General of the Army Kirill Meretskov, member of the front’s Military Council Army Commissar 1st Rank Alexander Zaporozhets, Chief of Staff Brigade Commander Grigory Stelmakh, chief political officer Division Commissar Pyotr Gorokhov, and assistant front commander Major General Pyotr Lyapin. By decision of the HQ Supreme High Command, on 24 April 1942, the Volkhov Front was merged with the Leningrad Front to reinforce the Soviet forces operating near Leningrad. There was a period when the Volkhov Front was reorganised as the Volkhov Group of the Leningrad Front, which was commanded by Lieutenant General Mikhail Khozin. Meretskov was appointed deputy commander-in-chief of the Western Strategic Command. But the subsequent developments showed that the Volkhov Front should operate as a separate group of forces. It was reinstated on 8 June 1942 and acted in this capacity until 15 February 1944. Kirill Meretskov was reappointed the front’s commander. Alexander Zaporozhets and Grigory Stelmakh kept their positions. The crew was reshuffled on 8 October 1942, when Corps Commissar Lev Mekhlis (promoted to Lieutenant General on 6 December 1942) was appointed member of the front’s Military Council. On 17 April 1943, he was replaced by Major General Terenty Shtykov (promoted to Lieutenant General on 24 August 1943). On 5 October 1942, Lieutenant General Mikhail Sharokhin was appointed chief of staff. On 26 June 1943, he was replaced by Lieutenant General Fyodor Ozerov. Brigade Commissar Konstantin Kalashnikov (promoted to Major General on 6 December 1942) was appointed the front’s chief political officer on 20 June 1942. [From 23 April to 8 June 1942 – the Volkhov Group of Forces of the Leningrad Front] Volkhov Front (first formation) 17 December1941 – 23 April1942 Commander General of the Army Kirill Meretskov Member of the front’s Military Council Army Commissar 1st Rank Alexander Zaporozhets Chief of Staff Brigade Commander Grigory Stelmakh, (promoted to Major General on 28 December 1941) Chief political officer Division Commissar Pyotr Gorokhov Volkhov Group of Forces of the Leningrad Front 23 April – 8 June1942 Commander Lieutenant General Mikhail Khozin [who was also commander of the Leningrad Front] Member of the front’s Military Council Army Commissar 1st Rank Alexander Zaporozhets Chief of Staff Major General Grigory Stelmakh Chief political officer Division Commissar Pyotr Gorokhov (23 April -12 May 1942); Division Commissar Iosif Shikin (12-19 May1942) [also chief political officer of the Leningrad Front] Volkhov Front (second formation) 9 June 1942 – 15 February 1944 Commander General of the Army Kirill Meretskov Member of the front’s Military Council: (9 June - 8 October 1942) Army Commissar 1st Rank Alexander Zaporozhets (promoted to Corps Commissar on 8 October 1942); (8 October 1942 -17 April 1943) Corps Commissar Lev Mekhlis (promoted to Lieutenant General on 6 December 1942); (17 April 1943 – 15 February 1944) Major General Terenty Shtykov (promoted to Lieutenant General on 24 August 1943) Chief of Staff (9 June – 5 October 1942) Major General Grigory Stelmakh; (5 October 1942 - 25 June 1943) Lieutenant General Mikhail Sharokhin; (25 June 1943 – 15 February 1944) Major General Fyodor Ozerov (promoted to Major General on 26 September 1943) Chief political officer (20 June 1942 – 15 February 1944) Brigade Commissar Konstantin Kalashnikov (promoted to Major General on 6 December 1942) Groups of forces Large units 1 January 1942 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 52nd Army 59th Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 87th Cavalry Division Artillery and mortar units 137th Howitzer Artillery Regiment (large calibre) 430th Howitzer Artillery Regiment (large calibre) 216th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanized units 60th Tank Division Air Force 2nd Reserve Air Group 138th Bomber Air Regiment 283rd Fighter Air Regiment 434th Fighter Air Regiment 515th Fighter Air Regiment 504th Assault Air Regiment 520th Fighter Air Regiment Engineer Force 539th Separate Sapper Battalion 1 April 1942 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 52nd Army 59th Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 2nd Rifle Division 1st Airborne Brigade 172nd Separate Ski Battalion 174th Separate Ski Battalion Artillery and mortar units 130th Howitzer Artillery Regiment (large calibre) 100th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 101st Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 7th Guards Tank Brigade 26th Separate Snowmobile Battalion 50th Separate Railroad Battery Air Force 2nd Reserve Air Group 3rd Guards Fighter Air Regiment 19th Fighter Air Regiment 41st Fighter Air Regiment 520th Fighter Air Regiment 10th Short-range Bomber Air Regiment 121st Short-range Bomber Air Regiment 673rd Light Bomber Air Regiment 116th Reconnaissance Air Wing Engineer force 3rd Sapper Brigade separate sapper battalion (without identification number) 1249th Separate Sapper Battalion 1769th Separate Sapper Battalion 135th Separate Engineer Battalion 159th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 539th Separate Sapper Battalion 1 July 1942 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 8th Army 52nd Army 54th Army 59th Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 6th Guards Rifle Corps 4th Guards Rifle Division 24th Guards Rifle Division 58th Rifle Brigade 13th Cavalry Corps 25th Cavalry Division 80th Cavalry Division 87th Cavalry Division 378th Rifle Division 1st Airborne Brigade Artillery and mortar units 42nd Guards Corps Artillery Regiment 165th Mortar Regiment 15th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 100th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 101st Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 461st Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 128th Separate Tank Battalion 23rd Separate Railroad Battery 50th Separate Railroad Battery 123rd Separate Air Defence Railroad Battery Air Force 2nd Reserve Air Group 3rd Guards Fighter Air Regiment 41st Fighter Air Regiment 10th Short-range Bomber Air Regiment 522nd Fighter Air Regiment 116th Reconnaissance Air Wing Engineer Forces 3rd Sapper Brigade 32nd Pontoon Bridge Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 36th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 55th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 539th Separate Sapper Battalion 1 October 1942 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 8th Army 52nd Army 54th Army 59th Army 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 191st Rifle Division 294th Rifle Division 22nd Rifle Brigade 32nd Rifle Brigade 53rd Rifle Brigade 73rd Marine Rifle Brigade 37th Ski Brigade 38th Ski Brigade 39th Ski Brigade Artillery and mortar units Anti-Tank Artillery Regiment (without identification number) 69th Guards Heavy Mortar Regiment 7th Separate Mortar Battalion 8th Separate Mortar Battalion 9th Separate Mortar Battalion 10th Separate Mortar Battalion 244th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 707th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 168th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 216th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 23rd Separate Railroad Battery Engineer forces 39th Engineer Special Brigade 8th Guards Sapper Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 770th Separate Engineer Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 1234th Separate Sapper Battalion 1718th Separate Sapper Battalion 1741st Separate Sapper Battalion 1746th Separate Sapper Battalion 1 January 1943 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 8th Army 52nd Army 54th Army 59th Army 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 239th Rifle Division 379th Rifle Division 11th Ski Brigade 12th Ski Brigade 13th Ski Brigade Artillery and mortar units 2nd Artillery Division 20th Light Artillery Brigade 7th Gun Artillery Brigade 4th Howitzer Artillery Brigade 13th Guards Army Artillery Regiment 21st Army Artillery Regiment 24th Army Artillery Regiment 430th Large-calibre Howitzer Artillery Regiment 46th Air Defence Artillery Division 21st Air Defence Artillery Regiment 22nd Air Defence Artillery Regiment 23rd Air Defence Artillery Regiment 24th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 707th Air Defence Artillery Regiment (of the 45th Air Defence Artillery Division) 168th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 216th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 23rd Separate Railroad Battery Engineer forces 1st Engineer-Miner Brigade 39th Special Operations Brigade 53rd Sapper Brigade 8th Guards Miner Battalion 734th Separate Miner-Sapper Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 135th Separate Engineer Battalion 32nd Pontoon Bridge Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 36th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 55th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 1 April 1943 Armies 2nd Shock Army 4th Army 8th Army 52nd Army 54th Army 59-thArmy 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 18th Rifle Division 65th Rifle Division 80th Rifle Division 147th Rifle Division 165th Rifle Division 38th Ski Brigade Artillery and mortar units 499th Separate Mortar Regiment 509th Guards Mortar Battalion (7th Separate Guards Mortar Brigade) 512th Guards Mortar Battalion (7th Separate Guards Mortar Brigade) 707th Air Defence Artillery Regiment (45th Air Defence Artillery Division) 168th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 216th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 7th Guards Tank Brigade 16th Tank Brigade 500th Separate Tank Battalion 501st Separate Tank Battalion 503rd Separate Tank Battalion 34th Separate Snowmobile Battalion 53rd Separate Snowmobile Battalion 56th Separate Snowmobile Battalion 23rd Separate Railroad Battery 22nd Separate Air Defence Railroad Battery Engineer forces 1st Engineer Miner Brigade 39th Special Operations Brigade 53rd Engineer Sapper Brigade 2nd Guards Miner Battalion 8th Guards Miner Battalion 734th Separate Miner-Sapper Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 135th Separate Engineer Battalion 136th Separate Engineer Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 36th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 159th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 1 July 1943 Armies 4th Army 8th Army 54th Army 59th Army 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 165th Rifle Division 239th Rifle Division 256th Rifle Division 378th Rifle Division Artillery and mortar units 8th Guards Gun Artillery Regiment 315th Separate Super-heavy Artillery Battalion 317th Separate Super-heavy Artillery Battalion 30th Mortar Brigade 7th Guards Mortar Brigade 10th Guards Mortar Brigade 12th Guards Mortar Brigade 194th Mortar Regiment 707th Air Defence Artillery Regiment (45th Air Defence Artillery Division) 1467th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 11th Guards Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 168th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 461st Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 7th Guards Tank Brigade 16th Tank Brigade 122nd Tank Brigade 33rd Guard Separate Tank Regiment 1433rd Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment 1434th Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment 500th Separate Tank Battalion 501st Separate Tank Battalion 503rd Separate Tank Battalion 507th Separate Tank Battalion 34th Separate Snowmobile Battalion 53rd Separate Snowmobile Battalion Engineer forces 1st Engineer Miner Brigade 2nd Guards Special Operations Engineer Brigade 8th Guards Miner Battalion 539th Separate Miner-Sapper Battalion 2nd Guards Separate Engineer Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 135th Separate Engineer Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 36th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 159th Pontoon Bridge Battalion Armies 4th Army 8th Army 54th Army 59th Army 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 382nd Rifle Division Artillery and mortar units 2nd Artillery Division 7th Gun Artillery Brigade 10th Guards Howitzer Artillery Brigade 315th Separate Heavy Artillery Battalion 317th Separate Heavy Artillery Battalion 7th Guards Mortar Brigade 10th Guards Mortar Brigade 45th Air Defence Artillery Division 707th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 1465th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 1466th Air Defence Artillery Regiment 634th Air Defence Artillery Regiment (41st Air Defence Artillery Division) 11th Guards Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 15th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 213th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 461st Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 7th Guards Tank Brigade 122nd Tank Brigade 1434th Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment 501st Separate Tank Battalion 503rd Separate Tank Battalion 34th Separate Snowmobile Battalion Engineer forces 2nd Guards Special Operations Engineer Brigade 9th Assault Engineer Sapper Brigade 8th Guards Miner Battalion 2nd Guards Separate Engineer Battalion 40th Separate Engineer Battalion 539th Separate Engineer Battalion 34th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion 1 January 1944 Armies 8th Army 54th Army 59th Army 14th Air Army Large units subordinate to the front’s command Rifle, airborne and cavalry units 7th Rifle Corps 256th Rifle Division 382nd Rifle Division 58th Rifle Brigade Artillery and mortar units 11th Guards Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion 168th Separate Air Defence Artillery Battalion Armoured and mechanised units 7th Guards Tank Brigade 123rd Separate Railroad Battery Engineer forces 12th Engineer Sapper Brigade 38th Pontoon Bridge Battalion Partisan resistance Three partisan units operated in the region. The Malaya Vishera unit included 55 partisans led by deputy director of the local college V. Semyonov (the commissar was K. Korobov, secretary of the district party committee). The Bolshaya Vishera unit had 7 partisans led by L. Karabach, secretary of the executive council of the regional party. The Msta unit of 18 partisans was led by S. Klementyev, military training instructor at the local college. Each unit was assigned a base stocked with clothes, food and munitions for three or four months. They were fully armed and ready to fight. In the second half of December, a special operations group of the Leningrad Partisan Movement Headquarters was established in Malaya Vishera to monitor and guide the partisan and resistance movement in the frontline area of the Volkhov Front. The group was led by Pankraty Sheverdalkin, assisted by D. Trapeznikov and N. Chmutov, instructors of the Leningrad Region party committee. The group had material resources, a radio centre and a printing shop. Its mission was to establish contact with partisan units in the frontline area, create new units and underground resistance groups, and coordinate their actions with Volkhov Front plans. Battalion commissar N. Bushuyev was put in charge of the section supervising the partisan movement at the front’s political department. Pankraty Sheverdalkin oversaw the creation of undercover party groups at railway stations, peat factories and several towns, the recruitment of agents and the establishment of a printing shop in the Malovishersky District. The people waged a fierce partisan struggle from the very first days of the occupation. The unit led by V. Semyonov absolutely terrorised the invaders. Its celebrated history begins with the partisans capturing three German pilots who jumped from a damaged plane. They delivered the pilots and the documents they had with them to the headquarters of the 52nd Army. Their first success inspired the partisans. They next ambushed and blew up 17 carts and killed 21 German soldiers and two officers on the road from Verebye to Mezhnik. Later they used the same tactics to destroy several carts and trucks with munitions and 20 German soldiers on the motorway between Gryady and Gorneshno. Luzhok villagers told the partisans that a German punitive group came to the village every day in search of partisans. Semyonov immediately ordered the unit’s commissar K. Korobov to set an ambush. The first 14 German soldiers who entered the village were killed, and the rest fled in panic. The partisans knew the terrain and had good contacts with the locals, which helped them enter the local villages and Malaya Vishera to deliver newspapers and leaflets to people, expose German lies and paste notices in German about punishment for plunder and violence. The partisans informed people in their zone of responsibility about the ceremony held in Moscow on the 24th anniversary of the October Revolution. Semyonov’s unit, which operated near the frontline north-east of Malaya Vishera, established regular and close contact with the command of the 52nd Army. The unit’s liaison persons every day delivered information about the enemy to the army headquarters. Acting on the headquarters’ orders, the partisans 15 times cut the enemy’s communication wires during fighting. Klementyev’s partisans greatly helped the regular units. They went on reconnaissance raids in the enemy rear. The command of the 52nd Army issued a commendation to the Malaya Vishera partisans for their assistance. The Bolshaya Vishera unit led by L. Karabach and commissar I. Bashukov operated near the villages of Paporotno, Nekrasovo, Aleksandrovskoye and Bolshaya Vishera. That small group held several successful operations to help the regular forces, cutting off communication wires 60 times and mining the sites after them each time. The partisans often stole wire from the enemy and brought it to regular units, once delivering over 5.5 km. The unit’s scouts found and blew up a large German ammunition depot. The partisans ambushed and destroyed a car of the local German headquarters, a small tank and six carts, taking out about 40 German soldiers. During an offensive launched by the 52nd Army, they led a cavalry regiment through to the enemy rear and jointly with it blocked the Gryady-Dubtsy railway line, encircling and destroying a large group of German forces near Bolshaya Vishera. "
Write review

10.08.2022 15:59:18

Наталия К.

Посетили экскурсию "Повесть временных лет", остались очень довольны. Программа насыщенная, интересная, познавательная, не утомительная. Побывали в Великом Новгороде, Старой Руссе, Валдай. Очень доброжелательное отношение и высокая отзывчивость гидов. Спасибо огромное за отдых! 3 дня пролетели на одном дыхании. Вернусь сюда обязательно.

Для этого объекта еще нет отзывов.